Goal- Academics

6 Oct

Goal- Academics

Post the creation of the Tuskegee Alumni NCAA Division I Exploration Consortium in 2010, Tuskegee University began a new era of advancement.

In October 2011 Tuskegee University released a number of objectives for the university. Some of the major goals are to have a student body of 5,000 students and adding additional new degree programs in the undergraduate and graduate schools. One of the ultimate goals is to transition Tuskegee University from being considered a baccalaureate college to being classified a research university by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

In August 2012 Tuskegee University released information about plans for the possible addition of medical and law schools in the future along with plans to start a new generation of Tuskegee Airmen with new programs for training pilots, air traffic controllers and aerospace engineers.

These planned Tuskegee University academic goal requirements more closely fit with those HBCU member institutions of NCAA Division I conferences than the current member institutions of HBCU Division II conferences.

Clark Atlanta University is the only HBCU Division II university classified as RU/H: Research Universities (high research activity) in the SIAC.  Fort Valley State University, Albany State University and Spring Hill College are the only Master’s level classified universities in the Division II SIAC.

With Tuskegee University’s planned enrollment growth, planned expansion of degree offerings and future increase in its graduation annual population size Tuskegee University must plan to align itself with like similar institutions and explore joining one of the Division athletic conferences that share the common academic goals.
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NCAA announces highest-ever Division I graduation rates

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What Research Universities classification means
from the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education

This video shows the announcement by the University of Arkansas when it received RU/VH: Research Universities (very high research activity) classification

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Reviewing NCAA Division I MEAC and SWAC academic classifications
Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education

NCAA Division I
Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference FCS

Classification Description

The Basic Classification is an update of the traditional classification framework developed by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education in 1970 to support its research program. The Basic Classification was published for use in 1973, and subsequently updated in 1976, 1987, 1994, 2000, 2005 and 2010.

The “shorthand” labels for the Doctoral Universities and Master’s Colleges and Universities were restored in the 2015 update to numeric sequences (R1, R2, R3, and M1, M2, M3) to denote that each one is based on differences in quantitative levels.

Doctoral Universities
Includes institutions that awarded at least 20 research/scholarship doctoral degrees during the update year (this does not include professional practice doctoral-level degrees, such as the JD, MD, PharmD, DPT, etc.). Excludes Special Focus Institutions and Tribal Colleges.
R1: Doctoral Universities – Highest research activity
R2: Doctoral Universities – Higher research activity
R3: Doctoral Universities – Limited research activity

Master’s Colleges and Universities
Generally includes institutions that awarded at least 50 master’s degrees and fewer than 20 doctoral degrees during the update year (with occasional exceptions – see Methodology). Excludes Special Focus Institutions and Tribal Colleges.
M1: Master’s Colleges and Universities – Larger programs
M2: Master’s Colleges and Universities – Medium programs
M3: Master’s Colleges and Universities – Smaller programs

Baccalaureate Colleges
Includes institutions where baccalaureate or higher degrees represent at least 50 percent of all degrees but where fewer than 50 master’s degrees or 20 doctoral degrees were awarded during the update year. (Some institutions above the master’s degree threshold are also included; see Methodology.) Excludes Special Focus Institutions and Tribal Colleges.
Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus
Baccalaureate Colleges: Diverse Fields
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MEAC contains: 5 Doctoral Universities, 7 Master’s Colleges & Universities and 1 Baccalaureate Colleges

Howard University
Doctoral Universities: Higher Research Activity
College of Arts and Sciences
Howard University School of Business
School of Communications
College of Dentistry
College of Medicine
College of Nursing & Allied Health Sciences
College of Pharmacy
School of Divinity
School of Education
College of Engineering, Architecture and Computer Sciences
School of Law
School of Social Work
Graduate School

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North Carolina A&T State University
Doctoral Universities: Higher Research Activity 
College of Arts and Sciences
College of Engineering
School of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences
School of Business and Economics
School of Education
School of Nursing
School of Technology
The Graduate School

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Florida A&M University DRU:
Doctoral Universities: Higher Research Activity
College of Agriculture and Food Sciences
College of Education
College of Engineering (FAMU-Florida State University)
College of Law
College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
College of Social Sciences, Arts and Humanities
College of Science and Technology
School of Allied Health Sciences
School of Architecture and Engineering Technology
School of Business and Industry
School of the Environment
School of Graduate Studies and Research
School of Journalism and Graphic Communication
School of Nursing

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Morgan State University
Doctoral Universities: Limited Research Activity
College of Liberal Arts
School of Architecture & Planning
School of Business & Management
School of Community Health & Policy
School of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences
School of Education & Urban Studies
School of Engineering
School of Global Journalism & Communication
School of Graduate Studies
School of Social Work

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University of Maryland Eastern Shore
Doctoral Universities: Limited Research Activity
School of the Arts and Professions
School of Business and Technology
School of Pharmacy and Health Professions
School of Agricultural and Natural Sciences
School of Graduate Studies

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North Carolina Central University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Larger Programs
College of Behavioral & Social Sciences
College of Arts & Sciences
School of Business
School of Education
School of Law
School of Library & Information Sciences
School of Graduate Studies
Department of Nursing

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South Carolina State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs
College of Education, Humanities & Social Sciences
College of Science, Mathematics, Engineering & Technology
College of Graduate and Professional Studies
School of Graduate Studies

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Hampton University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs
School of Business
School of Education and Human Development
School of Engineering and Technology
Scripps Howard School of Journalism and Communications
School of Liberal Arts
School of Nursing
School of Pharmacy
School of Science
University College (formerly College of Education and Continuing Studies)
Graduate College
College of Virginia Beach

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Norfolk State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs
College of Liberal Arts
College of Science, Engineering and Technology
School of Business
School of Education
School of Graduate Studies and Research
Ethelyn R. Strong School of Social Work
School of Extended Learning

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Delaware State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs
College of Agriculture & Related Sciences
College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences
College of Business
College of Education, Health & Public Policy
College of Mathematics, Natural Sciences & Technology
School of Graduate Studies and Research

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Coppin State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Small Programs
College of Arts, Sciences & Education
College of Behavioral & Social Sciences
College of Business

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Savannah State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Small Programs
College of Business Administration
College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences
College of Sciences & Technology
School of Teacher Education

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Bethune-Cookman University
Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus
College of Business and Entrepreneurship
College of Education
College of Science Engineering & Mathematics
College of Health Sciences
College of Liberal Arts
School of Nursing
School of Performing Arts and Communication
School of Religion
School of Graduate Studies

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NCAA Division I
Southwestern Athletic Conference FCS
SWAC contains: 3 Doctoral Universities, 6 Master’s Colleges & Universities and 1 Baccalaureate College

Jackson State University
Doctoral Universities: Higher Research Activity
College of Business
College of Liberal Arts
College of Public Service
College of Education and Human Development
College of Science, Engineering & Technology
School of Public Health Initiative
Division of Graduate Studies

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Prairie View A & M University
Doctoral Universities: Limited Research Activity
College of Agriculture and Human Sciences
Marvin D. and June Samuel Brailsford College of Arts and Sciences
College of Business
Whitlowe R. Green College of Education
Roy G. Perry College of Engineering
College of Juvenile Justice and Psychology
College of Nursing
School of Architecture

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Texas Southern University
Doctoral Universities: Limited Research Activity
Jesse H. Jones School of Business
Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs
College of Education
College of Science, Engineering & Technology
College of Liberal Arts &Behavioral Sciences
College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
School of Communication
Thurgood Marshall School of Law
Thomas F. Freeman Honors College
College of Continuing Education
The Graduate School

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Southern University and A&M College
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Larger Programs
College of Education, Arts and Humanities
College of Business
College of Engineering and Computer Science
College of Nursing and Allied Health
College of Social and Behavioral Sciences
College of Sciences and Agriculture
School of Graduate and Professional Studies

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Alabama A&M University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Larger Programs
College of Agricultural, Life & Natural Sciences​
​College of Business and Public Affairs
College of Education, Humanities and Behavioral Sciences
​College of Engineering, Technology & Physical Sciences
School of Graduate Studies

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Grambling State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Larger Programs
College of Arts & Sciences
College of Business
College of Education
College of Professional & Graduate Studies

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Alabama State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs
College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences
College of Business Administration
College of Education
College of Health Sciences
College of Science, Mathematics & Technology
College of Visual & Performing Arts
University College
Division of Aerospace Studies
The Graduate School

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Alcorn State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs
School of Agriculture, Research, Extension, and Applied Sciences
School of Arts and Sciences
School of Business
School of Education and Psychology
Cora S. Balmat School of Nursing

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Mississippi Valley State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Small Programs
College of Education
Department of Engineering Technology
Department of Business Administration
Department of Criminal Justice
Department of English and Foreign Languages
Department of Fine Arts
Department of Health, Physical Education and Recreation
Department of Mass Communication
Department of Mathematics, Computer & Information Sciences
Department of Natural Sciences and Environmental Health
Department of Social Sciences
Department of Social Work
Graduate School

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University of Arkansas Pine Bluff
Bac/Diverse: Baccalaureate Colleges–Diverse Fields
School of Agriculture, Fisheries and Human Sciences
School of Arts and Sciences
School of Business and Management
School of Education
Division of Graduate Studies and Continuing Education

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NCAA Division I
Ohio Valley Conference FCS
Tennessee State University
Doctoral Universities: Limited Research Activity
College of Agriculture, Human, and Natural Sciences
College of Business
College of Education
College of Engineering
College of Health Sciences
College of Liberal Arts
College of Public Service
School of Graduate Studies & Research

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NCAA Division II
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference

SIAC contains: 1 Doctoral Universities, 3 Master’s Colleges & Universities and 10 Baccalaureate Colleges
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Clark Atlanta University
Doctoral Universities: Higher Research Activity
School of Arts and Sciences
School of Business
School of Education
Whitney M. Young Jr. School of Social Work

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Albany State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs
College of Arts and Humanities
College of Education
College of Business
College of Sciences and Health Professions

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Tuskegee University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Small Programs
Andrew F. Brimmer College of Business and Information Science
College of Agriculture, Environment and Nutrition Sciences
College of Arts and Sciences
College of Engineering
College of Veterinary Medicine, Nursing & Allied Health
Robert R. Taylor School of Architecture and Construction Science
School of Education

Increase in the size of Tuskegee’s annual graduates in the Ph.D. degree programs will support change in the university’s classification. Tuskegee must awarded at least 20 research/scholarship doctoral degrees during a cycle of review by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education to move up to Doctoral Universities classification.
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Fort Valley State University
Master’s Colleges & Universities: Small Programs
College of Agriculture, Family Sciences and Technology
College of Arts and Sciences
College of Education
College of Graduate Studies and Extended Education

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Kentucky State University
Baccalaureate Colleges: Diverse Fields
College of Arts and Sciences
College of Agriculture, Food Science and Sustainable Systems
College of Business and Computer Science
College of Professional Studies

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Morehouse College
Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus
Division of Business Administration & Economics
Division of Humanities & Social Sciences
Division of Science & Mathematics

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Claflin University
Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus
School of Business
School of Education
School of Humanities & Social Sciences

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Benedict College
Baccalaureate Colleges: Diverse Fields
School of Business and Economics
School of Education
School of Continuing Education
School of Health and Human Services
School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
School of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

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Lane College
Baccalaureate Colleges: Diverse Fields
Division of Business, Social and Behavioral Science
Division of Liberal Studies and Education
Division of Natural, Physical Science and Mathematics

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Miles College
Bac/Diverse: Baccalaureate Colleges–Diverse Fields
Division of Business and Accounting
Division of Communications
Division of Education
Division of Humanities
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences
Division of Natural Sciences and Mathematics

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Paine College
Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus
School of Arts & Sciences
School of Professional Studies

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LeMoyne-Owen College
Baccalaureate Colleges: Diverse Fields
Division of Business and Economic Development
Division of Education
Division of Fine Arts and Humanities
Division of Natural and Mathematical Sciences
Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Central State University SIAC member effective July 1, 2013
Baccalaureate Colleges: Diverse Fields
College of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences
College of Business
College of Science and Engineering
College of Education

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Spring Hill College
On July 12, 2013, Spring Hill College was accepted by the NCAA to begin its process towards joining the NCAA Division II and joined the SIAC in 2014 becoming the first non-HBCU to join the conference.
Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus
Division of Business
Division of Communications/Arts
Division of International Studies
Division of Interdivisional Studies
Division of Language and Literature Division
Division of Nursing
Division of Philosophy and Theology
Division of Sciences
Division of Social Sciences
Division of Teacher Education

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Stillman College
Departed the SIAC in 2016. In addition to cutting 10 sports, Stillman also transitioned from NCAA Division II to being a part of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics(NAIA).
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SIAC Council of Presidents approves Spring Hill College for conditional admission
October  2, 2012 NCAA.org

Atlanta, GA—The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) announced that its Council of Presidents, by unanimous vote, approved the application of Spring Hill College for conditional membership, contingent upon acceptance into NCAA Division II.

July 12, 2013

Spring Hill College to move to NCAA

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has officially notified Spring Hill College that its application for membership in NCAA Division II has been accepted. Spring Hill College athletic director, Jim Hall, received the notification via email Friday July 12th.In October 2012, Spring Hill College accepted an invitation to join the 13-member Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC). The Badgers will now begin the process of making the transition from the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) to the NCAA and to full membership in the SIAC.

By becoming a member of the NCAA, Spring Hill College will now join the 26 Jesuit colleges and universities nationwide that are already members of the NCAA.

Achieving full NCAA Division II membership typically takes three years. Provided the athletic department successfully completes each phase of the membership process, Spring Hill will spend two years in candidacy status and then one year as a provisional member of NCAA Division II before gaining full membership status.

SHC will remain a member of the NAIA and the Southern States Athletic Conference (SSAC) for the 2013-14 seasons and will have access to SSAC and NAIA post-season championships. During the 2014-15 and 2015-16 academic years, Spring Hill will play a full slate of NCAA Division II and SIAC regular season competition. The Badgers would not be eligible for NCAA or SIAC post-season competition until the 2016-17 seasons after full NCAA Division II membership has been attained.

Spring Hill College participates in 16 varsity athletic programs that will make the transition to the NCAA Division II level.

Spring Hill College, located in Mobile, Alabama, has been a member of the NAIA since 1959.

http://www.shc.edu/news/2013/07/12/spring-hill-college-move-ncaa

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NCAA Academics
Higher initial eligibility standards

NCAA.org

The Division I Board of Directors, on April 26, 2012, voted to allow more time for high school students and those who guide them to become familiar with higher initial eligibility standards, which now will go into effect in 2016. The class entering college in 2016 is currently in eighth grade and now will have all four years in high school to work toward the new standard.

The Board adopted the increase in initial-eligibility expectations last October, with an effective date of 2015, to ensure prospects are more academically prepared for college coursework. Since then, some administrators, coaches associations and secondary school administrators expressed concern about the implementation schedule.


The new initial-eligibility requirements create a higher academic standard for freshman to play. That standard is higher than what will be needed to receive aid and practice, creating an academic redshirt year.

Student-athletes who achieve the current minimum initial-eligibility standard will continue to be eligible for athletically related financial aid during the first year of enrollment and practice during the first regular academic term of enrollment. Student-athletes could earn practice during the second term of enrollment by passing nine semester or eight quarter hours.

For immediate access to competition, prospective student-athletes must achieve at least a 2.3 GPA and an increased sliding scale. For example, an SAT score of 1,000 requires a 2.5 high school core-course GPA for competition and a 2.0 high school core-course GPA for aid and practice.

Prospects also must successfully complete 10 of the 16 total required core courses before the start of their senior year in high school. Seven of the 10 courses must be successfully completed in English, math and science.

The new requirements are intended to ensure prospective student-athletes are as prepared to succeed in the classroom as they are in their sport, a message NCAA President Mark Emmert underscored in his Final Four press conference.


NCAA research indicates student-athletes in football and men’s basketball will feel the most significant impact from the higher academic standards. Those sports regularly post the lowest Academic Progress Rates and Graduation Success Rates.

The impact is expected to decrease over time as prospective student-athletes adjust to the changes and improve their preparation.

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Student-athletes academic standards

NCAA.org

Student-athletes must meet academic standards throughout their careers on campus to remain eligible to participate in intercollegiate athletics. Member institutions in each division create academic standards specific to that division’s goals.

In Division I, student-athletes must complete 40 percent of the coursework required for a degree by the end of their second year. They must complete 60 percent by the end of their third year and 80 percent by the end of their fourth year. Student-athletes are allowed five years to graduate while receiving athletically related financial aid. All Division I student-athletes must earn at least six credit hours each term to be eligible for the following term and must meet minimum grade-point average requirements that are related to an institution’s own GPA standards for graduation.

Teams in Division I are also subject to the Academic Progress Rate (APR), a standard that measures a team’s academic progress by assigning points to each individual student-athlete for eligibility and retention/graduation.

In Division II, student-athletes must complete 24 hours of degree credit each academic year to remain eligible for competition. At least 18 of those hours must be earned between the start of fall classes and spring commencement at a student-athlete’s institution (six hours may be earned in the summer). All Division II student-athletes also must earn at least six credit hours each full-time term to be eligible for the following term.

In addition, Division II student-athletes must earn a 1.8 cumulative grade-point average after earning 24 hours, a 1.9 cumulative grade-point average after earning 48 hours and a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average after earning 72 hours to remain eligible. Student-athletes are given 10 semesters of full-time enrollment in which to use their four seasons of competition, provided they maintain academic eligibility.

Division II student-athletes must complete their four seasons of competition within the first 10 semesters or 15 quarters of full-time enrollment.

While there are no minimum national standards for establishing or maintaining eligibility in III, student-athletes in that division must be in good academic standing and make satisfactory progress toward a degree as determined by the institution.

Division III student-athletes must be enrolled in at least 12 semester or quarter hours, regardless of an institution’s own definition of “full time.”


Institutions in all divisions must determine and certify the academic eligibility of each student-athlete who represents the school on the field of play. Institutions are responsible for withholding academically ineligible student-athletes from competition.

Waivers are available for many of these rules, including progress-toward-degree standards.

Student-athletes who are declared academically ineligible must use the student-athlete reinstatement process to be restored to competition.
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Why do academic standards vary among NCAA divisions?

NCAA member institutions choose to affiliate with the division that most closely reflects that institution’s values and mission. Just as each institution has unique characteristics that attract different kinds of students, each NCAA division is distinctive and has its own requirements.

Why are Division I and II student-athletes required to complete a certain percentage of their degree each year?

One of the main goals of the NCAA is to integrate athletics with academics. With that in mind, the memberships in Divisions I and II have approved eligibility standards intended to maximize graduation rates while minimizing disparate effects on economically disadvantaged groups. The Division I standards currently in place (both percentage-of-degree requirements and the minimum grade-point average standards) are supported by data that show student-athletes who are most likely to graduate will in fact meet these standards.

What are the Division I grade-point average requirements to remain eligible?

Student-athletes must achieve 90 percent of the institution’s minimum overall grade-point average necessary to graduate (for example, 1.8) by the beginning of year two, 95 percent of the minimum GPA (1.9) by year three and 100 percent (2.0) by year four.

What are Division II grade-point average requirements to remain eligible?

Based on a 4.0 scale, Division II student-athletes must earn a 1.8 GPA after 24 semester or 36 quarter hours, a 1.9 GPA after 48 semester or 72 quarter hours and a 2.0 GPA after both 72 semester or 108 quarter hours and 96 semester or 144 quarter hours.

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Tuskegee’s international students 1908
Tuskegee Class of 1908

Tuskegee Class of 1913
Tuskegee Class of 1913

Tuskegee Class of 1915
Tuskegee Class of 1915

Tuskegee’s international students 1916
Tuskegee  Class 1916

Tuskegee’s Nursing Students 1917
Tuskegee Nursing Students 1917

Tuskegee Class of 1932
Class of 1932

Tuskegee 5 year architecture professional degree Class of 1993
Architecture Class of 1993

Tuskegee PhD graduate Class of 2010
Tuskegee PhD graduate Class of 2010

Tuskegee alumnus Lionel Richie delivered the commencement address at Tuskegee University on May 9, 2010
Tuskegee alumnus Lionel Richie

Tuskegee’s PhDs in Engineering
Tuskegee PhDs

Tuskegee’s Doctors of Veterinary Medicine
Tuskegee  Doctors of Veterinary Medicine

Tuskegee alumnus Tom Joyner receives an honorary Doctor of Letters degree in 2011
Tuskegee alumnus Tom Joyner 2011

Tuskegee’s Veterinary Medicine Class of 2012
Tuskegee College of Veterinary Medicine 2012

Tuskegee Class of 2013
Tuskegee Class of 2013

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